One of the biggest headwinds for electric vehicle (EV) uptake has been the charging experience. EV models on the market today require a plug-in charger for use either at home or a public station. The idea of going wireless with induction charging has been floated for years, promising benefits such as a reduction in battery size and cost, extended driving range, reduced pressure on the grid, and the ability to charge multiple EVs simultaneously. While a number of big-name companies are working on the technology and running pilots, traction has been slow. That’s starting to change.

“In five years, wireless EV charging will be the dominant form of charging infrastructure globally,” predicts Oren Ezer, Co-Founder and Chief Executive of wireless charging specialist Electreon. “Wires and cables will never appear on the busy streets of mega cities like Paris or along New York’s 5th Avenue. Inevitably, EV charging will become less of the charging stations that people are accustomed to today and more of the invisible coils below major highways and busy streets for charging EVs as they move.”